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dc.contributor.authorLang’at, Richard Kipkemoi
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-22T08:38:56Z
dc.date.available2022-06-22T08:38:56Z
dc.date.issued2021-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://erepository.mku.ac.ke/handle/123456789/5712
dc.description.abstractChildhood immunization remains one of the fundamental components of primary health care and one of the most cost-effective public health initiatives. Further to that, averting and eliminating vaccine preventable morbidities in the world. As a result, a few children aged 12 to 23 months in Kenya performed below average in respect to immunization coverage among completely immunized children. Procrastination of immunizations would upsurge the menace for inoculation avertible morbidities in the community. In light of that, the information obtained from this study would provide assistance to policymakers formulate sound strategies to increase immunization coverage from 57%- 90%. The broad objective of the research was to determine factors influencing low vaccination coverage between children of ages 12 to 23 months in Narok South subcounty, Narok County in Kenya. This was to contribute in the reduction of morbidity and mortality caused by infectious diseases of public health importance related to vaccinepreventable disease. Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive research study. The researcher combined two methods, that was quantitative and qualitative. An organized questionnaire was used to capture data on social demographic factors, maternal health care utilization, and knowledge. Key informative Interviews and Focus Group Discussions were used to capture qualitative data on 454 mothers/caretakers with children aged between 12-23 months reached in Narok South sub-county. Results: The total number of mothers/caregivers who were interviewed were 454, with a response of 100%. Results of immunization coverage; BCG 73%, OPV1 59%, OPV2 51%, OPV3 49%, Penta1 58%, Penta2 51%, Penta3 50%, Measles 54% and Fully Immunized Children 47%. Further to that, 47% of the children in the sub-county were fully immunized and 53%, partially immunized 29% and 24% unimmunized. The SD mean for mothers/caregivers and children 31.4 and 17.0 respectively and over 70% of the mothers/caregivers had no formal education. There were significant association predictors with immunization coverage included maternal education (X2 =11.75, df=4 p value<0.02), distance to health facility (X2 =62.30, df=2 p value <0.00), also, there was strong significant association with childbirth ranking (OR =1.218, p value<0.04). Bivariate analysis, there was an association with mothers/caregivers’ who had more than one visits with fully immunized children (χ2=13.54, df =2 and p value <0.001), source of the immunization information OR=0.75 and p value <0.02 and, ultimately, there was association between mother’s/caregiver place of delivery with non-fully immunized children (X2=74.40, df=1 p value<0.01). Predictors of non-fully immunized children in the study population were; place of delivery, family size, education level, source of income, none attendance of Antenatal clinics, distance to the health facility, source of the vaccination information was associated with incomplete fully immunized children. Conclusion: The immunization coverage for the fully immunized children in the sub county was very low 47%, compared to national 77%. Key players in the immunization sector should identify children who are at risk, deploy reach every child strategy, encourage pregnant mothers to attend ANC. In addition, expand outreach services, increase funds allocation to health sector and build more health facilities to improve immunization coverage.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMount Kenya Universityen_US
dc.subjectHealth careen_US
dc.subjectChildhood immunizationen_US
dc.subjectInfectious diseasesen_US
dc.titleDeterminants of immunization coverage among children aged 12 - 23 months in Narok South, Narok County-Kenyaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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